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Research 6 & 7

Thursday 3rd July 2014, 15:30 - 16:30

Showroom Cinema 1

Two 30 minute research sessions…

6. World of Wonder: Why Gaming Appeals to Kids
Exploring the world of children and their relationship to gaming, including the attractions of playing and winning, and the potential for benefits or hazards.
7. Transformational Technology
Understanding how technology is transforming children’s interaction with the world.

 

6. World of Wonder: Why Gaming Appeals to Kids
Exploring the world of children and their relationship to gaming, including the attractions of playing and winning, and the potential for benefits or hazards.

Presented by Dr Barbie Clarke and Siv Svanaes, Family Kids and Youth

Read blog: Research 6
View the presentation: Research 6

There is concern expressed about children’s prolific use of on-line gaming sites, and yet the numbers of children playing games appears to be on the increase.

Mobile devices make this easier, and parents are often not aware that their children are playing games. Some teachers on the other hand are arguing that ‘gamification’ could make the teaching of difficult lessons easier.

This research seeks to delve into the world of children and their relationship to gaming. It looks at the potential benefits of gaming as well as the hazards. It seeks to understand why children are so attracted to playing and what winning means to them.

Based on focus groups and interviews with over 3,000 children aged 10-16, the research analyses what it is that attracts children to gaming, why they play games that are 16+, and how some gaming can be beneficial.

7. Transformational Technology
Understanding how technology is transforming children’s interaction with the world. 

Presented by Andrew Manches, University of Edinburgh

Read blog: Research 7
View the presentation: Research 7

Research has attempted to understand the relationship between the way children interact with the world and their physical, affective, social, and cognitive development. This has meant trying to bring together recent theories (which have highlighted the importance of interaction in the way children think and learn) with more practical approaches to evaluating and creating new digital designs for, and with, children. Working with a range of technologies, such as touch-screens, tabletops, gesture recognition devices or tangibles (digitally augmented physical objects), research in this field has addressed many questions that are increasingly relevant to the CMC community.

This talk will draw upon several projects at the University of Edinburgh’s Children and Technology group (as well as Andrew’s own industry experience) to discuss how digital technology is changing children’s interaction with the world, the possible impact this has on the way children think and learn, and the implications for designing new media experiences.

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