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Report – Commissioner Conversations: VoD and OTT

Posted on: Thursday 07 July 2016 11:52am by Oliver Ellis

Children increasingly access content via VOD/OTT. As these services acquire more and make original content, what are they looking for and how can you get involved?

Video:

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Podcast:

 

Is there ‘New hope’ in the SVoD sunny uplands? Guest blogger Oliver Ellis feels the Force…

Takeaways

  • Different VOD channels have different content needs but all agreed they no longer need standard amount of eps or running length. Everything is possible
  • The VOD services serve two audiences: Children for content but parents for approval of that content and for safety online. Co-viewing on VOD is a real point of difference
  • To have impact online, content has to be high quality

Detail

Changemaker, Rich Keith, Chief Revenue Officer for Yogscast, opened the session and impressed with spectacular figures. Their bouquet of channels on YouTube receive 100M+ views and have a social media footprint of 5M+ followers.Photo commissioner convers 2

More than 60 years worth of video is watched every day on Yogscast channels, with most viewers are under the age of 21. They are clear that the audience they are reaching want authentic content that is delivered to them anytime and where they are – which means mostly on mobile devices.

Lucy Murphy, Head of Kids Content at Sky, emphasised that Sky’s connection with its customers is based on the knowledge that kids will love it and parents will trust it. More than 4,500 episodes of kids shows are available, with ‘Morph’ as Sky’s first commission.

There are exciting new commissions in the offing for Sky too, including a science show as well as a wildlife programme.

The exclusive content from Sky Sports for kids and short form web content includes nursery rhymes, music and short form comedy. All watched via ‘the big television’, via Now TV Kids pass or the Sky Kids app, with the guarantee of a safe environment. And there are more new commissions and apps to come!

Estelle Lloyd, founder of Azoomee, explained how they offer videos, games, books and a messaging app for kids from 5 to 11 years of age. No ads, no in-app purchases. They will soon be launching a new browser for kids with the mission always being to keep kids safe online, with NSPCC as their strategic partner.

Estelle is looking for more tutorials, in baking, cooking, coding and more games. So get in touch if this sounds like an opportunity. Azoomee have recently commissioned ‘Search It Up’, a 20 x 2’ online safety series, and ‘Marvellous Makes’ and ‘Hands Up’, both tutorials for arts and crafts.

Miki Chojnacka, Chief Creative and Content Officer at Hopster, pitched the service as the UK’s number one grossing app for kids. Their USP is quality content, a magical world and personalised tech.

Hopster’s goal is to increase the current 29% of games on the platform to 50%. They are developing books and expanding the magical world to make it more dynamic, creative and immersive, with eight new locations to visit.

Julien Borde, Head of SVoD at France Televisions, explained that they invest €27M in kids animation per year, and the France tvmcn service has gained 1 billion views, mostly from the 40 kids’ channels. Their top three are ‘Little Brown Bear’ (‘Petit Ours Brun’), ‘Raving Rabbids’ and ‘Charlie the One’ (‘T’choupi’), which have all been recommissioned based on their success. The next step is the launch of the SVOD service in March 2017 which will be a freemium service that will cross genres.

So are Lucy, Estelle, Miki and Julien our Princess Leia, Luke Skywalker, Han Solo and Chewbacca? It would seem they are indeed our New Hope.

By guest blogger Oliver Ellis

Oliver Ellis

About the author

Oliver Ellis

HoHo Entertainment, Joint MD

Hoho Entertainment was co-founded in Jan 2011 by Oliver Ellis and Helen Howells to develop, finance and produce children’s properties, designed to be seen and experienced on all media platforms. Oliver started his career editing a children’s comic, ‘The Shoe People Monthly’. He went on to write books and stories for the… Read more

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