CMC British Animation Afternoon – Session 2

Posted on: Thursday 22 March 2012 1:01pm

The CMC organised an afternoon of panel discussions and case-studies on the afternoon before the British Animation Awards – 15th March 2012. The topic was digital futures for the animation industry.

Thanks to Sanjay d’Humières for his blog copy:

Digital Opportunities

Chair:

Oli Hyatt, Creative Director, Blue-Zoo

Panelists:

David Curry, Director, LeSinge Media

Greg McLeod, Director, Brothers McLeod

Vicky Brophy, MD, Wonky

Jos Carlyle, Creative Director, Persian Cat Pre>

Oli began with a wide and open-ended question: Are digital opportunities for television and digital platforms completely different or have we reached a point in this converged world where they have become totally joined?

The overall consensus from panelists was that digital has happened and therefore it had to be embraced with small online commissions becoming progressively bigger. When asked the question Jos Carlyle explained that in her field (publishing), digital helped children get a more enriched sensory experience. She also added that most of her company’s work was based on new titles with the online experience at the forefront of her mind and that adaptations off existing works are done, but in small quantities. The Gift, Persian Cat Press’ first picture book would have been very difficult to achieve and publish without digital technology.

It seems that digital tools have also helped the speed at which productions are completed and the number of projects that can be achieved in a year. This can have a big impact on finances, which is vital to any business operating in a competitive market. With digital exploitation, IP can be exposed much faster as the audience/fan base can be found quickly.

The panelists pointed out during the session that an online product is as costly to create, maybe more so, compared to content for television and that end-users often tend to take that for granted. They expect everything online to be free. When this perception changes (over time) this will benefit content makers who will be able to monetise more easily and spend less time convincing users to pay. In the end payment will be the way to get great content. The question is when will consumers realise this.

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